Caracal Safety Recall

Damnit.  It appears that a Caracal pistol discharged when it was dropped.  Caracal has issued a recall that covers pretty much every Caracal imported into the US.

Link, with updates.

At least one person has been unable to replicate this malfunction, so my guess is that there’s a tolerance stacking issue with the firing pin block or its related parts.

This is not good news for Caracal.  But, they seem determined to deal with the problem in a professional manner.  Offering to buy back guns subject to the recall is something I’ve never heard of in this industry.

Stay tuned for more news.

-C

The More you Bleed in Training…

…the rustier your guns get.

“Oh the pain, the horrible pain!”

I was breaking in the new Glock 34 during my usual Thursday night live-fire practice at the NRA Range.  I spent a fair amount of time doing concealed draws at 7 yards, and during one of my runs I managed to slice my finger open on the razor-like Warren Tactical rear sight.

I also worked on the emergency reload for a bit, and noticed a possible hitch. Four times during the practice, the slide failed to go into battery.

Glock Perfection

Weird, huh? This happened with a few different magazines, so I’m wondering if I might need to replace my magazine springs. I’ve also seen this kind of stoppage with longer-than-spec ammo, so I should probably check the loading press over.

Other than that, I have some high hopes for this particular Glock.  It has one of the better out-of-the-box triggers I’ve felt on a Glock, and I’m holding consistent 3″ groups offhand with it (five shots at 25 yards.)  I’ll be wringing it out more thoroughly over the next few weeks.

Weekend Wrap-Up

I was down in North Carolina this weekend, shooting the Tidewater 3-Gun match.  It was a good time as always, especially as the rain stopped just as the first stage started.

I’ve lately been trying out that trendy new shotgun quad load.  I’m not as fast with it as I am loading weakhand, but it’s getting better.  I might need to order some more carriers soon.  On the other hand, my pistol shooting was a little bit sloppy.  I’ve been spending most of my dryfire time working on that shotgun reload, and it’s showing a little bit.  Sometimes there just aren’t enough hours in the day.

I should have some photos up soon.  Stay tuned.

Running the Glock Trigger, Part Two

Note – In retrospect, this should probably be titled, “Running the ‘Pistol XYZ’ Trigger.”  The methods and training practices that work well with the Glock should also work well with many other guns.

Recently, over at Pistol-Forum.com, there was a great discussion about managing the Glock pistol trigger at speed.  P-F.com member and firearms instructor Wayne Dobbs posted an excellent comment, including a training drill that I just got a chance to try out.  I’ll repeat the highlights here:

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Okay You Punks, Freeze!

How could I have neglected to link to this display of badassery?

AIWB Awesomeness

A couple of commenters in the thread mentioned the idea of an 80′s cop show themed pistol match. Maybe my collection of Hawaiian shirts is starting to affect my brain, but I find this idea intriguing.  Maybe use modified IDPA rules, limit guns and gear to stuff in production as of 1985.

Hmm.  I wonder if there’s any way to safely allow shoulder rigs?

Someday, It Will be Mine…

I wandered up to my friendly neighborhood arms dealer yesterday morning, to start the paperwork on a new Gen4 Glock 34.  Much to my delight, my Caracal F was there too, and I spent a few minutes checking it out.

Sorry for the lousy cellphone pic. Left my real camera in the car.

- The build quality on my Caracal was first-rate, at least to a visual inspection.  There were no visible machining marks, the finish was nicely applied, etc.  Overall, the Caracal gave the impression of being a quality piece.

- The trigger is wonderful.

- The sights…  well, there’s nothing wrong with them that a 5/32″ carbide ball end mill won’t fix.  The Caracal standard sights share the same problem as many other factory guns – the front sight is too wide, the rear sight is too narrow, and having the rear sight integral to the slide makes replacement, um, complicated.  This is one of those times when having a gunsmith in the family is really nice.

The Caracal is presently tied up in the bureaucratic hell that is the Maryland Handgun Roster Board, but it should be in my hands by mid-October.  I’m looking forward to running it through some heavy testing.

Thanks to Bob at Shooting Ventures for handling all the paperwork.  If you need a gun transfered in Maryland, he’s the man to see.

Running the Glock Trigger

Glocks are not, in my opinion, easy guns to shoot.

There are two types of triggers that lend themselves to natural accuracy, and selecting between them is mostly a matter of personal preference.  The first type is the classic “glass rod” trigger – short and light takeup, crisp break, and very little overtravel.  This type of trigger is normally represented in the 1911-pattern gun.  The second type of trigger is often described as a “rolling break” – constant weight across the full trigger travel, indistinct break, and lots of overtravel.  This type of trigger is commonly found in old DAO revolvers, and the new Caracal pistol has an excellent example of a rolling break.

Glocks have neither type of trigger; a typical Glock trigger has a fairly heavy takeup, a distinct break, and lots of overtravel.  This makes the Glock very sensitive to trigger finger position. A little bit too much/too little trigger finger, and you start getting wide shots left and right.

So what to do? Well, you can try removing some of the overtravel from your trigger. Lone Wolf Distributing sells a Glock trigger housing with an overtravel screw installed, or you could try a Ghost Rocket connector. I’ve tried both, with limited success.

You can also play with you trigger finger position, to ensure that you are moving the trigger straight to the rear. I’ve found that I need to use only the barest tip of my finger to press the trigger. Others have reported that they pull the trigger with the crease of the first knuckle.

When you dryfire, keep an eye on how the front sight moves. Any significant lateral movement during dryfire means the trigger is bearing to one side during the overtravel. Try doing twenty reps of a perfect trigger press with your normal finger position, twenty reps with a lot more finger, and twenty reps with a lot less finger. See which finger position yields the least sight movement. A laser sight can be really useful for this drill, as it makes lateral shake at the muzzle very easy to see.

-C

AAR – F2S Consulting High-Stress Shooting Class

Pictures from the class

Over the weekend of July 28th, I attended the (first!) F2SConsulting High-Stress Shooting Class, held at the Echo Valley Training Center in High View, WV.

The F2S High-Stress Shooting Class is an advanced course, intended for students who have previous training with the pistol and carbine.  The purpose of the High-Stress Shooting course is to instruct the students in solving complicated shooting problems, under conditions of environmental, physical, and psychological pressure.  The instructors for the course are Jack Leuba and Chris Abernathy.  Jack and Chris are USMC veterans with extensive combat and instructional experience.

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